Promises by Martin Luther

Promises

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If God promises something, then faith must fight a long and bitter fight, for reason or the flesh judges that God’s promises are impossible. Therefore faith must battle against reason and its doubts. The Devil, too, approaches us with promises, and indeed such as seem very plausible. It certainly requires at times a keen mind rightly to distinguish between God’s true and the Devil’s false promises. The promises of the Devil are seemingly very pleasant and acceptable. Faith is something that is busy, powerful and creative, though properly speaking, it is essentially an enduring than a doing. It changes the mind and heart. While reason holds to what is present, faith apprehends the things that are not seen. Contrary to reason, faith regards the invisible things as already materialized. This explains why faith, unlike hearing is not found in many, for only few believe, while the great majority cling to the things that are present and can be felt and handled rather than to the Word.

This, then, is the mark of the true divine promises, that they are contrary to reason so that it refuses to believe them. The promises of the Devil, on the contrary, are in full agreement with reason and are readily and uncritically accepted. God’s promises which are true and faithful, lead to the cross, and by the cross to His eternal blessing. Therefore reason is offended at them in two ways. It regards as nothing what is invisible and far away in the future, and it detests the cross as a calamity that is everlasting and without end. That is the reason why despite the riches of the divine promises, few believe them. These are such whose hearts are led by the Holy Spirit so that, as Abraham, they defy all foes and cling to the Word of God who calls them.

Before Abraham came to Canaan he was blessed in many ways, but in the land of promise, he, despite his strong faith was forced to go into another country to escape the fury of the famine. God does this purposely to try the faith of His saints. However after a short time, He restores to them not only earthly prosperity, as Abraham became very wealthy, but He also gives them a greater faith and a deeper experience of His divine grace and mercy. For this reason Paul says in Romans 5:3 that though God’s saints sigh under their cross, yet they glory in their tribulations when they discover how wonderfully God directs their life.

God thus proves Himself the Protector of all that put their trust in Him. He tries their faith by chastisements, but never forsakes them. Finally, He gloriously delivers them and at the same time benefits others with them.

by Martin Luther

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THE GLORY OF GOD – John MacDuff

THE GLORY OF GOD

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“Before the mountains were born or You brought forth the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, you are God!” — Psalm 90:2

O My Soul! Seek to fill yourself with thoughts of the Almighty. Lose yourself in the impenetrable tracts of His Glory!

“Can you by searching find out God?” Can the insect fathom the ocean, or the worm scale the skies? Can the finite comprehend the Infinite? Can the mortal grasp Immortality? We can do no more than stand on the brink of the shoreless sea, and cry, “Oh the depth!”

“From everlasting!” — shrouded in the great and amazing mystery of eternity! Before one star revolved in its sphere — before one angel moved his wing — God was! His own infinite presence filling all space. All time, to Him, is but as the heaving of a breath — the beat of a pulse — the twinkling of an eye!

The Eternity of bliss, which is the noblest heritage of the creature, is in its nature progressive. It admits of advance in degrees of happiness and glory. Not so the Eternity of the Great Creator; He was as perfect before the birth of time — as He will be when “time shall be no longer!” He was as infinitely glorious when He inhabited the solitudes of immensity alone — as He is now with the songs of angel and archangel sounding in His ear! But “who can show forth all His praise?” We can at best but lisp the alphabet of His glory. Moses, who saw more of God than most, makes it still his prayer, “I beseech You, show me Your glory!” Paul, who knew more of God than other men, prays still, “that I may know Him.” “Our safest eloquence concerning Him,” says Hooker, “is our silence, when we confess that His glory is inexplicable.”

And is this the Being to whom I can look up with sweetest confidence — and call “My Father”? Is it this Infinite One, whom “the Heaven of Heavens cannot contain,” I can call “My God”?

Believer, contemplate the medium through which it is you can see the glory of God, and yet live. “No man has seen God at any time, the only-begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, He has revealed Him.” He who dwells in inaccessible light, comes forth from the pavilion of His glory in the person of “Immanuel, God with us.” In Christ, “the Image of the invisible God,” the creature — yes, sinners — can gaze unconsumed on the lusters of Deity! Be it yours to glorify Him. Seek thus to fulfill the great design of your being. Let all your words and ways, your actions and purposes, your crosses and losses, redound to His praise. The highest seraph can have no higher or nobler end than this — the glory of the God before whom he casts his crown.

But He has a claim on you, which He has not on the unredeemed angels. “He gave Himself for you!” This mightiest of all boons which Omnipotence could give, is the guarantee for the bestowment of all lesser necessary blessings, and for the withholding of all unnecessary trials. While you are called to behold “His glory, the glory as of the only-begotten of the Father,” remember its characteristic; it is not a glory to appall you by its splendors — but to win and captivate you by its beauties — it is “full of grace and truth.” He is your God in covenant. “Underneath are the everlasting arms.” You may compose yourself on your nightly pillow, with the sweet pledge of security, and say,

“I will both lie down and sleep in peace, for You alone, O Lord, make me live in safety!” — Psalm 4:8

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John MacDuff – THE NIGHT WATCHES

THE WORD OF GOD by James Smith

THE WORD OF GOD

James Smith, New Park Street Church, London, 1849

“All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.” 2 Timothy 3:16-17

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The Bible is God’s book, written under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, and therefore free from error; “Holy men of God wrote as they were moved by the Holy Spirit.”

It contains God’s law, the church’s history, and Christ’s gospel.

It reveals God, opens heaven, and directs man.

It makes known God’s thoughts, the world’s doom, and the church’s blessedness.

It unfolds eternity to time, brings heaven to earth, and makes invisible realities known.

It was written for sinners, has been preserved by a special providence, and is the godly man’s treasure.

Infidels scorn it, angels study it with wonder, and the saints delight in it.

It is a token of God’s love, a proof of his regard, and a display of his concern for our welfare.

This Word of God contains . . .
the Law—commanding, condemning, and cursing;
the Psalms—disclosing, elevating, and praising;
the Gospel—unfolding, inviting, and directing;
the Prophets—predicting, exhorting, and denouncing.

It contains a rich variety, a divine fullness, and is exactly adapted to meet the case and condition of sinners.

Its histories are true, instructive, and impartial.
Its precepts are just, holy, and good.
Its cautions are beneficial, wise, and useful.
Its exhortations are judicious, adapted, and profitable.
Its reproofs are kind, solemn, and suitable.
Its directions are merciful, practical, and plain.
Its instructions are deep, spiritual, and extensive.
Its corrections are loving, just, and judicious.
Its doctrines are divine, sublime, and glorious.
Its descriptions are vivid, correct, and impartial.
Its invitations are general, attractive, and gracious.
Its promises are great, numerous, and invaluable.
Its warnings are solemn, preventing, and tender.
Its threatenings are dreadful, alarming, and just.
Its parables are simple, instructive, and edifying.
Its types are significant, impressive, and suitable.
Its examples are bright, winning, and worthy.
It is in every part, and every way, worthy of a God!

We have this blessed book as God’s free gift, procured for us by our adorable Redeemer, and bestowed upon us through the Holy Spirit. Its revelations were delivered, first orally, then written, then printed: first given to a few, then written for many, then printed for all: first freely bestowed, then hard to be obtained and now easily to be gotten. Given by God, opposed by the devil, blasphemed by many, rejected by more, unknown to thousands—but highly prized by a few. It is suited to youth, adapted to manhood—but peculiarly applicable to old age. It is the child’s lesson book, the learner’s class book, and the scholar’s text book. Many study it, all Christians believe it—but none fully comprehend it.

This divine testimony is exceedingly useful; for it produces morality in the world, spirituality in the church, and good in all who believe it. It . . .
enlightens the dark,
instructs the ignorant,
comforts the desponding,
directs the lost,
encourages the seeking,
assures the waiting soul,
warns the wayward,
threatens the unruly,
condemns the impenitent,
invites the weary,
strengthens the weak,
consoles the dejected,
alarms the careless,
accuses the indifferent,
confounds the worldly-wise,
cautions the venturesome,
reproves the heedless,
gives promises to the diligent,
frowns on the thoughtless,
curses the profane,
damns the hypocrite,
urges the halting,
exhorts the obedient,
rewards the persevering,
debases man,
exalts the Savior,
glorifies God,
astonishes angels,
confounds infidels,
delights perishing sinners.

The Bible is God’s will, the saints’ treasure and the devils’ eye-sore!

This holy writing is intended for earth, it is placed before our eyes, to be copied into our memories, and observed in our lives. The world has it, the church owns it, and every part of God’s family may equally enjoy it. It is intended for the whole of this life, to be used through our entire journey—but will be dispensed with when we get home. It is here in written characters, there in substance, and both here and their prized and enjoyed. It is here to be read, believed, and tasted; but its fullest blessings are reserved for that better land. Now we need it, while on earth we cannot dispense with it—but in heaven we shall be able to do without it.

This book is pure—unmixed with error, untainted by sin, and worthy of a holy God.

This book is true—and may therefore be firmly believed, implicitly trusted, and unreservedly depended upon.

This book is sure—and cannot possibly deceive, lead astray, or sanction a mistake.

This book is right—being in perfect accordance with the holiness, justice, and grace of God.

This book is assimilating—he who believes it, loves it, and obeys it—must resemble it.

This book is divine—the offspring of God, bearing the impress of divinity, and is always acknowledged by Jehovah when pleaded at his throne.

This book is spiritual—and therefore cannot be understood by the carnal, the worldly wise, or anyone who is untaught of God.

This book is mysterious—containing mysteries which are to be believed, reverenced, and acknowledged, though never in this world to be fully comprehended.

This book is excellent—in its matter, style, and design.

This book is extensive—embracing more than the human mind can contain, than any creature could invent, or the whole of time will unfold.

This book is firm—and cannot be removed, driven out of the world, or destroyed.

This book is full—containing all that is necessary, ornamental, or useful.

This book is feeding—it feeds the memory, the intellect, and the heart.

This book is filling—it satisfies the illiterate, the learner, and the scholar.

This book is glorious—and glorifies God, the Savior, and the church.

This book is harmonious—every part accords, harmonizes, and agrees.

This book is honest—it exposes, commends, and reproves, as the case may be.

This book is immutable—it can undergo no change in its doctrines, requirements, or promises.

This book is irrevocable—heaven and earth may pass away, but its predictions, threatenings, and promises shall stand forever.

This book is inviting—for God stoops to write, instruct, and give wisdom to worms.

This book is incomparable—it never had, has not now, nor ever will have—an equal.

This book is infallible—here are no mistakes, misquotations, or exceptions, all is the word of God, and worthy of a God.

This book is lively—it gives life, quickens the dull and sleepy, and preserves the life given.

This book is ministerial—being the seed of God, the scepter of the Messiah, and the sword of the Spirit.

This book is necessary—for our information, consolation, and establishment.

This book is nourishing—it strengthens our faith, animates our hope, and quickens our love.

This book is conquering—it overcomes Satan, destroys sin, and leads sinners as willing captives to the Prince of peace.

This book is original—nothing is borrowed, stolen, or altered—all is of divine origin.

This book is penetrating—it wounds the heart, pierces the conscience, and divides between soul and spirit.

This book is perfect—as a whole, and in every part; it contains a perfect system of doctrine, a perfect code of precepts, and a perfect variety of truth to meet every possible case.

The Bible is compared to . . .
a fire, that burns;
a hammer, that breaks;
a sword, that pierces and slays;
a light, that shines in a dark place;
a lantern, that guides the feet;
milk, which nourishes and feeds;
a suit of armor, which protects the person;
incorruptible seed, which always brings forth fruit.
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It is called . . .
the word of God,
the word of righteousness,
the word of reconciliation,
the word of life,
the word of faith,
the word of salvation,
the word of grace,
the word of truth,
the faithful word,
a more sure word of prophecy,
the word of the saint’s testimony,
and the word of Christ.

Of this word, Job could say, “I have esteemed the words of his mouth, more than my necessary food.”

Jeremiah exclaims, “Your words were found, and I ate them; and your word was unto me the joy and rejoicing of my heart!”

David appeals to the Lord and says, “Your word have I hid in my heart, that I might not sin against you. I will delight myself in your statutes, I will not forget your word. Your word is very pure, therefore your servant loves it. My eyes stay open through the watches of the night—that I may meditate on your word.”

Jesus said, “The Scriptures testify of Me.”

Paul insists, “All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.”

O, for greater love to the Scriptures—that we may know them, enjoy them, conform to them, exercise faith in them, and make them our delight! May we read them daily, pray over them constantly, meditate on them frequently, and manifest their holy tendency in life and death. May our memories be stored with them, our hearts be sanctified by them, and our lives correspond with them.

O may these heavenly pages be
My ever dear delight;
And still new beauties may I see,
And still increasing light!

James Smith, New Park Street Church, London, 1849

The Lord is on my side Octavius Winslow

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The Lord is on my side; I will not fear: what can man do unto me?” Psalm 118:6

God must be on the side of His people, since He has, in an everlasting covenant, made Himself over to be their God. In an especial manner, and in the highest degree, He is the God of His people. In the most comprehensive meaning of the words, He is for us. His love is for us—His perfections are for us—His covenant is for us—His government, extending over all the world, and His power over all flesh, is for us. There is nothing in God, nothing in His dealings, nothing in His providences, but what is on the side of His people. Enshrined in His heart, engraved on His hand, kept as the apple of His eye, God forms a mighty bulwark for His church. “As the mountains are round about Jerusalem, so the Lord is round about His people from henceforth even forever.” In Christ Jesus, holiness, justice, and truth, unite with mercy, grace, and love, in weaving an invincible shield around each believer. There is not a purpose of His mind, nor a feeling of His heart, nor an event of His providence, nor an act of His government, that is not pledged to the happiness, the security, the well-being of His people. What Joshua said to the children of Israel, trembling to encounter the giants of Anak, may be truly said to every believer in view of his foes, “The Lord is with us, fear them not.”

Not the Father only, but the Son of God, is also on our side. Has He not amply proved it? Who, when there was no eye to pity, and no arm to save, undertook our cause, and embarked all His grace and glory in our salvation? Who slew our great Goliath, and rescued us from Pharaoh, discharged our debt, and released us from prison? Who extinguished the fires of our hell, and kindled the glories of our heaven? Who did all this by the sacrifice of Himself? Oh, it was Jesus! Need we further proof that He is for us? Who appears on our behalf within the veil? Who sits for us as a priest upon His throne? Whose blood, first shed on Calvary, now sprinkles the mercy-seat? Who pleads, and argues, and intercedes, and prays for us in the high court of heaven? Whose human sympathy flows down in one continuous stream from that abode of glory, blending with our every trial, and suffering, and sorrow? Who is ever near to thwart our foes, and to pluck our feet from the snare of the fowler? Oh, it is Christ! And there is not a moment of time, nor a circumstance of life, in which He does not show Himself strong in behalf of His people.

And so of the Holy Spirit. Who quickened us when we were dead in trespasses and in sins? Who taught us when we were ignorant, enlightened us when we were dark, comforted us when we were distressed; and when wounded and bleeding, and ready to die, led us, all oppressed with guilt and sorrow as we were, to Jesus? Who inspired the first pulsation of life, and lighted the first spark of love; who created the first ray of hope in our soul, and dried the first tear of godly grief from our eye? Oh, it was the eternal Spirit, and He, too, is for us. Survey the record of your own history, dear reader. What a chequered life yours, perhaps, has been! How dotted the map of your journeyings, how many-colored the stones that have paved your path, how varied and blended the hues that compose the picture of your life! And yet, God constructed that map, God laid those stones, God pencilled and painted that picture. God went before you, God is with you, and God is for you. He was in the dark cloud that enshrouded all with gloom, and He was in the sunshine that gilded all with beauty. “I will sing of mercy and of judgment; unto You, O Lord, will I sing.” Who has carried forward the work of grace in our souls—checking our feet, restoring our wanderings, holding up our goings, raising us when we had fallen, and establishing our feet more firmly upon the rock? Who has befriended us when men rose up against us? Who has healed all our diseases, and has filled our mouths with good things, so that our youth has been renewed like the eagle’s? It was the Lord who was on our side, and not one good thing of all that He has promised has failed.

Octavius Winslow

The God of the broken-hearted – J. R. Miller

The God of the broken-hearted

(J. R. Miller, “The Beatitude for the Unsuccessful” 1892)
“The Lord is near the broken-hearted.” Psalm 34:18

The God of the Bible, is the God of the broken-hearted. The world cares little for the broken hearts. Indeed, people oftentimes break hearts by their cruelty, their falseness, their injustice, their coldness–and then move on as heedlessly as if they had trodden only on a worm! But God cares. Broken-heartedness attracts Him. The plaint of grief on earth–draws Him down from heaven.

Physicians in their rounds, do not stop at the homes of the well–but of the sick. So it is with God in His movements through this world. It is not to the whole and the well–but to the wounded and stricken, that He comes with sweetest tenderness! Jesus said of His mission: “He has sent Me to bind up the broken-hearted.” Isaiah 61:1

We look upon trouble as misfortune. We say that the life is being destroyed, which is passing through adversity. But the truth which we find in the Bible, does not so represent suffering. God is a repairer and restorer of the hurt and ruined life. He takes the bruised reed–and by His gentle skill makes it whole again, until it grows into fairest beauty. The love, pity, and grace of God, minister sweet blessing of comfort and healing–to restore the broken and wounded hearts of His people.

Much of the most beautiful life in this world, comes out of sorrow. As “fair flowers bloom upon rough stalks,” so many of the fairest flowers of human life, grow upon the rough stalks of suffering. We see that those who in heaven wear the whitest robes, and sing the loudest songs of victory–are those who have come out of great tribulation. Heaven’s highest places are filling, not from earth’s homes of glad festivity and tearless joy–but from its chambers of pain; its valleys of struggle where the battle is hard; and its scenes of sorrow, where pale cheeks are wet with tears, and where hearts are broken. The God of the Bible–is the God of the bowed down–whom He lifts up into His strength.

God is the God of those who fail. Not that He loves those who stumble and fall, better than those who walk erect without stumbling; but He helps them more. The weak believers get more of His grace–than those who are strong believers. There is a special divine promise, which says, “My divine power is made perfect in weakness.” When we are conscious of our own insufficiency, then we are ready to receive of the divine sufficiency. Thus our very weakness is an element of strength. Our weakness is an empty cup–which God fills with His own strength.

You may think that your weakness unfits you for noble, strong, beautiful living–or for sweet, gentle, helpful serving. You wish you could get clear of it. It seems to burden you–an ugly spiritual deformity. But really it is something which–if you give it to Christ–He can transform into a blessing, a source of His power. The friend by your side, whom you envy because he seems so much stronger than you are–does not get so much of Christ’s strength as you do. You are weaker than him–but your weakness draws to you divine power, and makes you strong.

“He heals the broken-hearted and binds up their wounds.” Psalm 147:3

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J. R. Miller 1892

 

All Things Possible with God

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The omnipotence of Jehovah is ruled by His wisdom and holiness, His justice and love. He can do everything consistent with those attributes — but nothing contrary to them. God’s omnipotence is altogether on the believer’s side. All that God consistently can do — He will do for His people. Nothing is too hard for the Lord. He can make us contented in the most trying circumstances — and happy in the deepest affliction. He can so bring down our minds to our condition — that we shall glory in tribulation; and in the midst of fiery persecution, triumph in Christ. He can turn darkness into light, and bitter into sweet; and bring the richest joy out of the deepest sorrow. The omnipotent God is your God! His omnipotence is engaged for you! And in consequence, all things are possible to you, through believing.

Do not dwell on your own weakness — but on the Lord’s strength. Do not think of difficulties — call nothing impossible. “Is anything too hard for me? Do not I fill Heaven and earth, says the Lord?” David sings, “The Lord is my light and my salvation — whom shall I fear? The Lord is the strength of my life — of whom shall I be afraid? Though a host should encamp against me — my heart shall not fear; though war should rise against me — in this will I be confident.”

Do not look at your difficulties — but at the omnipotent God as engaged for you! Do not dwell on what you are called to suffer — but on what God can enable you to suffer, and that with patience, resignation, and gratitude. He can make you a most patient and grateful sufferer — and so mold your spirit to His will, as to cause you to prefer sickness to health, pain to ease, poverty to plenty, and disgrace to honor — if He can but be glorified thereby. Yes, He can so fill you with His grace and Spirit, as you shall have no will but His; and no desire but that He may be glorified in you, by life or by death.

Do not look too much at what you are — but at what your God can make you! Look at the Apostles and martyrs — they endured as seeing Him who is invisible, and in the strength of God were more than a match for the rage of men, or the greatest tortures.

“Is it possible,” you may say, “that I could be a child of God — and yet be so tried, and feel so weak, and not feel the presence of God with me, though I am in trouble?” Oh yes, more than possible. You shall be held up, for God is able to make you stand. You are safe — though not comfortable. The Lord is with you, though He does not shine upon you. He cannot leave you — because of His faithfulness. He may conceal Himself from you — because of His wisdom and love. His ways are in the sea, His paths in the mighty waters, and His footsteps are not known! It is possible for God to hold you fast in the most slippery path, when surrounded by the most determined foes, and feeling the greatest weakness — and He will do so! None shall be able to pluck you out of His hand. It is possible for God to supply all your needs, in the most trying times; as He did Elijah by the ravens, and the poor widow by the increase of the oil and meal. And He will do so; only seek the Lord, trust in the Lord, leave difficulties with the Lord — and you shall not lack any good thing. He will display His wisdom, sovereignty, pity, and power in dealing with you; and perhaps fill you with wonder, surprise, and love, at His ways.

All that God is — He is to you!

All He has — He has for you!

All He has promised — He will fulfill in you!

Ever, ever remember that all things are possible to . . .
your God,
your Father,
your Savior,
and your Friend!

“I can do all things through Christ, who gives me strength!” Philippians 4:13

Jesus, my Savior and my Lord!
‘Tis good to trust your name;
Your power, your faithfulness, and love,
Will ever be the same!

What, though my griefs are not removed
— yet why should I despair?
While everlasting arms support,
I can the burden bear!

Weak as I am — yet through your grace,
I all things can perform;
And triumph in your saving name,
Amid the raging storm!

All Things Possible with God by James Smith, 1842

 

Counsel and Comfort “Hope in God.” Psalm 42:5 – James Smith

Counsel and Comfort

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“Hope in God.” Psalm 42:5

Fellow-Christian, we live in trying times. Nations are convulsed, thrones are tottering, crowns are falling, confusion reigns, and men’s hearts are failing them for fear! We cannot but feel; but we ought not to fear. There is enough to make us watch and pray — but not enough to deject or cast us down The Lord reigns. Our Savior has all power in Heaven and in earth. He directs every event, and will overrule every occurrence for the fulfillment of his word, and the good of his beloved people. “He works all things after the counsel of his own will.” Men may rage, infidels may blaspheme, professors may murmur, and real Christians may be filled with alarm; but He says, “My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure.” The Lord sits above the water-floods, he remains King forever! Therefore, let no man’s heart fail him. Let us look to the divine word. Let us look out for the Lord’s hand. There is the rainbow of mercy in every cloud; but only the eye of faith can discern it.

Beloved, are you passing through storms, tempests, and trials? Hope in God — whatever your trial may be.

Are you sick? He will make your bed, and sanctify your pain.

Are you poor? He will answer your prayers, and supply your need.

Are you sorrowful? He will comfort you, and give you joy for your sorrow.

Are you tempted? He will not allow you to be tempted above that you are able to bear.

Are you bereaved? He will be better to you than ten children. He will be a father to the fatherless, and a husband to the widow. He is a friend that loves at all times, and ever lives to manifest his friendship.

Are you in perplexity? He will bring the blind by a way which they knew not, and make your way plain before you.

Do you imagine that your trials are singular? He assures you that no temptation has taken you but such as is common to men, and he bids you not to think it strange concerning the fiery trial that is to try you.

Do you doubt your interest in Jesus, and your title to the promises? Read his sweet invitations, cast yourself afresh into his arms, and still hope in his mercy. Whatever may be your trial, whether inward or outward, personal or relative, spiritual or temporal, still “hope in God.”

Hope, and do not fret, though the wicked prosper, and everything seems to be against you.

Hope, and do not murmur; for you have a thousand mercies more than you deserve, and more than some of your fellow-pilgrims.

Hope, and do not despond; for all things shall work together for your good; your God has his way in the whirlwind and in the storm.

Hope, and do not forebode; for light is sown for the righteous, and joy for the upright in heart.

Hope, and do not complain; for your Lord forewarned you of all that has happened. He told you that in the world you should have tribulation — but in him you should have peace.

Hope, and do not dread; no, not even death: for he who has delivered does deliver, and he will yet deliver you. He has delivered you in six troubles, and in seven he will not forsake you.

Hope in God — for he is gracious, merciful, long-suffering, and abundant in goodness and truth. He is faithful to his word. He is full of love to his children. He is pledged by his word to be a father to you. He will not fail you, nor forsake you. He will surely do you good, and do you good even by your present trials and troubles.

Hope in God — for he has an infinite variety of blessings to bestow. He has all you need — and has it for you. He has all you ever will want — and he will supply all your need. He has all you can consistently desire — and he will fulfill the desire of those who fear him; he also will hear their cry, and will save them.

Hope in God — for he has said to the coming sinner, “I will never cast out.” To the tried saint, “Cast your burden on the Lord, and he shall sustain you.” To every believer, “My grace is sufficient for you.” To the weary, way-worn pilgrim to the celestial country, “Your shoes shall be iron and brass, and as your days so shall your strength be.” To each Christian, “I will never leave you, I will never, no never, forsake you!”

Hope in God — for he will do as he has said; yes, he will do exceeding abundantly above all we can ask or think. He will make all his goodness pass before us, and show us great and mighty things which we know not.

Hope in God — for you may; his invitations warrant you.
You ought; for his commands lay you under obligation.
You should; for his promises are exceedingly great and very precious.

Hope, then, in God
not in circumstances — however favorable;
not in creatures — however kind;
not in events — however propitious;
not in connections — however encouraging;
not in evidences — however bright;
not in prospects — however blooming.

Hope in God —
when you read his word,
when you attend his ordinances,
when you face his foes,
when you circulate his truth,
when he hides his face,
when your comforts wither,
when your gourds die,
when your friends forsake you,
when your foes slander you,
when your health declines,
when poverty approaches,
when storms gather,
when Satan assaults, and
when death stares you in the face!

Hope — and be not dismayed. Let hope be . . .
the helmet that guards your head;
the anchor that steadies your vessel;
the friend that holds up your head when the water-floods overflow you.

In a word, at all times, in all places, under all circumstances — hope in God, for you shall yet praise him, who is the health of your countenance and your God!

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James Smith, 1865